Divorce and Estate Planning

 

What happens to your Estate Plan if you get a divorce?

 Divorce is a mess.  I know first-hand.  There are several things you should consider after some of the smoke clears.  If you don’t have an estate plan, now would be a great time to get it done.  If you do have an estate plan, you will want to make some changes.

 

California has a law that after divorce, any gifts in your Will to your now ex-spouse are revoked.  Even so, it is best to create an entirely new Will.  One of the reasons is that your Will is used to name a guardian for your children.  If you have children with your ex-spouse, and barring any ruling to the contrary, if one spouse dies, the court will most likely award the surviving spouse custody.  In the event that both parents are unavailable, your designation of a Guardian may control who raises your children depending on the circumstances.  You will also want to change the Executor and Beneficiaries named in your Will.

 

 

Be Active, Be Through

 Some things to consider:

  • First and foremost, talk to an Estate Planning Attorney like myself
  • Re-do your Will
  • Re-do your Revocable Living Trust
  • Change the beneficiary on the various accounts you own where you’ve named your now ex-spouse as the beneficiary such as:

 Life Insurance

Power of Attorney

Health Care Power of Attorney (also called an Advance Healthcare Directive)

Retirement accounts

Bank accounts

  • Check your vehicle titles
  • Check your deeds to any Real Property

 

 

As I said before, divorce is a mess.  I can help you clean-up your estate plan and help you get these things behind you so that you can move forward with your life.

 

Please feel free to give me a call today and we can review your situation and Estate Plan goals.    

 

See lots of estate planning information on my website at: www.myestate-plan.com

 

 

William Daniel Powell (Dan)

619-980-2297

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

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This document is for informational purposes only.  Nothing in this is to be considered legal advice.  Nothing in this shall create an attorney/client relationship, nor shall it create a confidential relationship.  If you need legal advice (in California), feel free to contact me or someone licensed to practice in your jurisdiction.  I assume no liability or responsibility for actions taken, or not taken, as a result of reading this information

Also, please remember that I speak in generalities in my blog and my website. There are so many different factors that can contribute and completely change the outcome that it would be impractical to discuss all of them here.

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Do I Need a Living Trust? My Granddad’s Story

 

The phone on the kitchen pass-thru rang.  Granddad was in the hospital, had taken a turn, and this was the call we hoped didn’t come in.  It was quickly decided how many cars to drive to the hospital and as it turned out I drove myself there.  Hindsight being what it is, I should have ridden with someone because I may have fractured a speeding law while simultaneously setting a new land speed record in driving my Dodge Charger to the hospital in an emotional and horsepower fueled semi-panic.  Probably not the safest, but I was 18 years old and loved my granddad very much.

 

He never came home from the hospital and mom helped grandma with all that she could.  I remember asking my mom about what was next to come.  I felt bad asking if there was going to be a reading of the Will because I didn’t want to appear like I was interested in material things, but the reality was that I believed that was just how it happened.  I thought it was like how we see it happen on TV.  You know, sitting in a lawyer’s office, with wood paneling on the wall, and all the family sitting in chairs listening.  That’s not how it happens.  The reality was that there was very little estate planning in place, and my mom had to deal with most of the issues and red tape.  After things were cleared up, she told her mom that she really needed to create a Living Trust, and grandma agreed.

 

Have you had someone close to you pass away?  Aside from the emotional pain and distress this caused, if the loved one had no estate planning in place – no Will, no Revocable Living Trust, nothing – and you had to handle the affairs, I sure you realize what a mess this can create.  If you’ve never dealt with this, I’m sure you can learn from others.

 

I’ll give you an explanation of just one of the rewards of creating an estate plan beyond avoiding the mess that not having any estate plan creates, and that is avoiding the costs and time delay of probate.  Let’s say you have an estate worth $650,000.  That is not difficult to do living here in San Diego.  Let us assume that you have a home worth $500,000 and accounts and other property that values at $150,000.  Now with Probate, it doesn’t matter that you owe $10 for your home, or $400,000, the estate is still valued, and costs are still determined at the $650,000 number.  The statutory amount an attorney can charge is $16,000.  The Executor of the estate is also allowed to charge the estate for his or her services up to the statutory amount.  So in this example, another $16,000.  Excluding court costs and other costs, we can see that the cost of Probate for an estate valued at $650,000 is potentially $32,000.  Wow, that’s a lot compared with the few thousand dollars that an inter vivos living trust will cost you.  Plus, Probate usually takes a year or longer.  You can avoid all this loss very easily – create an Estate Plan today.  By the way, a Trust goes by many different names including Living Trust, Revocable Trust, Revocable Living Trust, Inter Vivos Trust, Inter Vivos Living Trust and others.  You can read more about the costs of Probate in my blog.

 

Please feel free to give me a call today and we can review your Estate Planning goals.  Everyone’s situation is different, and I can help create solutions to address your specific goals and your particular situation. 

 

See lots of estate planning information on my website at: www.myestate-plan.com

 

William Daniel Powell (Dan)

619-980-2297

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

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This document is for informational purposes only.  Nothing in this is to be considered legal advice.  Nothing in this shall create an attorney/client relationship, nor shall it create a confidential relationship.  If you need legal advice (in California), feel free to contact me or someone licensed to practice in your jurisdiction.  I assume no liability or responsibility for actions taken, or not taken, as a result of reading this information

Also, please remember that I speak in generalities in my blog and my website. There are so many different factors that can contribute and completely change the outcome that it would be impractical to discuss all of them here.

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What is the difference between Medicare, Medicaid, and Medi-Cal?

In a Nutshell

In a nutshell, Medicare is a federal program that provides basic health insurance and prescription coverage to those 65 years of age and up, or those under 65 years old that are eligible for Social Security Disability benefits.  Medicare does not pay for long-term care.  Some skilled care is provided for a short time and if certain requirements are met, but it is not the norm.

 

Medicaid is a federal and state program that provides health care coverage for persons of all ages if they have a low income and limited resources.  The definition used is that Medicaid is a government insurance program for persons of all ages whose income and resources are insufficient to pay for health care.  Therefore, if you make over a certain amount of money, you won’t qualify for Medicaid.  Medicaid pays medical costs and long-term care costs.  Medicaid also has a right to seek reimbursement from the decedents estate for long-term care, and also for medical care costs.  There are several rules and circumstances involved, and will be discussed in another one of my blogs.

 

 

Medi-Cal is also a program that provides care to persons with low income and limited resources. It is what the federal Medicaid program is called in California, and is therefore essentially the same thing. 

 

 

All of these programs will be discussed in more detail in my blog posts.

 

Please feel free to give me a call today and we can review your situation and other Estate Planning goals.  Everyone’s situation is different, and I can help create solutions. 

 

See lots of estate planning information on my website at: www.myestate-plan.com

 

William Daniel Powell (Dan)

619-980-2297

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

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This document is for informational purposes only.  Nothing in this is to be considered legal advice.  Nothing in this shall create an attorney/client relationship, nor shall it create a confidential relationship.  If you need legal advice (in California), feel free to contact me or someone licensed to practice in your jurisdiction.  I assume no liability or responsibility for actions taken, or not taken, as a result of reading this information

Also, please remember that I speak in generalities in my blog and my website. There are so many different factors that can contribute and completely change the outcome that it would be impractical to discuss all of them here.

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ILIT Trusts – Keeping the Proceeds out of the Insured Estate for Federal Estate Tax Purposes

 

 

Do Life Insurance Proceeds get Included in my Estate for Death Taxes?

 

What are Death Taxes?  For the purpose of federal tax, the is something called federal estate tax exclusion and it is adjusted, or indexed, for inflation.  In 2016 the federal estate tax exclusion is $5.45 million dollars for an individual, and $10.9 million dollars for a couple.  That means that an individual dying in 2016 with an estate valued at less than $5,450,000 dollars will not owe any federal estate tax.

 

So how do we determine what is includable in the decedents estate for federal estate tax?  Let’s leave that for another discussion.  Suffice it to say that generally life insurance IS includible in the insured’s estate for death tax purposes.  Even an Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust (ILIT) may be included in the insured’s estate.  An ILIT is used expressly TO keep the proceeds out of the insured’s estate, so what gives?  Well, if the Irrevocable Trust is poorly drafted or managed, the proceeds may be included.  Also, if the insured gratuitously transfers all the rights in the policy within three years of his or her death, the Internal Revenue Service code section 2035(a) makes the proceeds includible in the decedent’s estate for federal estate tax purposes.   The reason is the way the IRS sees it is that the gift was made “in contemplation of death”, and therefore is disallowed. 

 

 

Does an ILIT’s proceeds get included in my Estate for Death Taxes?

 

The purpose of an Irrevocable Life Insurance Trust is to keep the proceeds out of the insured’s estate for federal estate tax.  This is achievable if the above criterion is met (policy not transferred within three years of the insured death), and certain other criteria is also met.  One of these is that the insured must not require that the beneficiary use the proceeds to pay obligations of the estate such as taxes.  Another is that the insured must not possess “incidents of ownership”.

 

 

What are Incidents of Ownership?

 

Incidents of ownership means the power of the insured or his or her estate to control the proceeds of the policy, the power to change beneficiaries, to assign the policy, to borrow or loan from the policy, and others. 

 

So, as you can see there are many restrictions and requirements in how the Trust is drafted, and how it is maintained in order for this ILIT Irrevocable Trust to function as intended.   Consult an attorney like me for your Estate Planning needs to help insure a proper outcome. 

 

 

Please see my Blog for continued discussion of various aspects of ILIT Trusts.

 

 

Please feel free to give me a call and we can establish your Living Revocable Trust, ILIT, or other Estate Planning goals today.  If you have specific estate planning objectives, I can help create solutions to achieve your specific purpose. 

 

See lots of estate planning information on my website at: www.myestate-plan.com 

 

Thanks for reading my blog.

William Daniel Powell

619-980-2297

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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This document is for informational purposes only.  Nothing in this is to be considered legal advice.  Nothing in this shall create an attorney/client relationship, nor shall it create a confidential relationship.  If you need legal advice (in California), feel free to contact me or someone licensed to practice in your jurisdiction.  I assume no liability or responsibility for actions taken, or not taken, as a result of reading this information

Also, please remember that I speak in generalities in my blog and my website. There are so many different factors that can contribute and completely change the outcome that it would be impractical to discuss all of them here.

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Using Life Insurance in Estate Planning for small estates or young couples.

 

Many young people and young couples don’t think much about estate planning because in our early life, we don’t have much property or funds with which to plan!  For those young couples or individuals with children, money is probably even more thin.  These young people and young couples likely need estate planning more than they know.  What happens to your kids or spouse should something happen to you?  Admittedly, it is not fun to think about, but why leave the burden to your loved ones?  So many couples now have both spouses working and removing one of the streams of income can be devastating.  I know I wouldn’t want an unexpected fifty percent reduction in my income – no matter what point I was at in my life.  Not only is an income stream now gone, but there will likely be other short-term expenses such as medical, funeral, living expenses, and other bills. 

 

 

Life Insurance and Estate Planning to the Rescue!

 

Life insurance is a brilliant Estate Planning tool.  For the young person or young couple (or anybody really), life insurance can be utilized to provide funds where none may otherwise exist. 

 

Life insurance can create an estate that was not otherwise present.    

 

Life insurance can “fund” a Living Trust for the benefit of your family and used to help take care of a variety of things including:

  • The creation of the estate itself
  • Payment of taxes
  • Replacement of an income
  • Paying medical and funeral costs
  • Pay for college
  • Or just about anything else that money is used for

 

While you can designate a beneficiary of the life insurance policy without creating an Estate Plan, there are other considerations.  Having the Trust as the beneficiary of the policy proceeds provides all of the normal protections that a Revocable Living Trust provides.  Utilizing a Living Trust (or potentially an Irrevocable Trust) is better than naming a beneficiary for several reasons.  What happens of you and your spouse die simultaneously?  What if your kids are minors?  Without a proper Estate Plan, court proceedings will need to be instigated where there are minor children that are to receive property.  A Living Trust can help protect your beneficiaries from losing half their inheritance due to a bad marriage, or other predators.

 

Please feel free to give me a call and we can establish your Living Revocable Trust or other estate planning objectives today.  If you have specific estate planning goals, I can help create solutions you may not be aware of. 

 

See lots of estate planning information on my website at: www.myestate-plan.com

 

Thanks for reading my blog.

 

William Daniel Powell

619-980-2297

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

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This document is for informational purposes only.  Nothing in this is to be considered legal advice.  Nothing in this shall create an attorney/client relationship, nor shall it create a confidential relationship.  If you need legal advice (in California), feel free to contact me or someone licensed to practice in your jurisdiction.  I assume no liability or responsibility for actions taken, or not taken, as a result of reading this information

Also, please remember that I speak in generalities in my blog and my website. There are so many different factors that can contribute and completely change the outcome that it would be impractical to discuss all of them here.

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Friday, 06 May 2016 04:09

What is an A/B Trust Used For?

What is an A/B Trust? 

 

First, let me explain the “usual” situation.  A married couple creates a Joint Revocable Living Trust.  Think of this Revocable Living Trust as a single bucket.  This Trust, or bucket, holds whatever property the couple decides to put into it.  Usually, the couple gives everything to the surviving spouse, and the surviving spouse can use all of the assets and decide who is to receive the remaining assets or even revoke the Trust.  It is a Revocable Living Trust after all. 

 

Now let us consider the following scenario: a person remarries with children from the previous marriage.  The new spouse may or may not have children of their own.  How does such a “blended family” plan their estate so that children from previous marriages don’t get cut out?  An A-B Trust may be a good solution to such a thing. 

 

So let’s think of an A/B Trust as a bucket with a dotted line down the middle.  Each spouse puts property into the bucket (the A/B Trust), and is free to do with it what they like while both spouses are alive.  Upon the first spouse to die, their half of the bucket – the B Trust – solidifies and cannot be changed by the surviving spouse.  The A Trust, or the survivors Trust, remains in the control of the surviving spouse.  Usually the surviving spouse can continue to live in the family residence, and have access to other assets provided the Trust is drafted in such a manner.

 

If I have children from a Prior Marriage, Should I use an A/B Trust if I Remarry?

 

The answer to this question is that an A/B Trust is a good tool to use in “blended family” situations, but it is only one option.  The facts of your particular situation will guide how the Estate Plan should be drafted. 

 

Please feel free to give me a call and we can establish your Living Revocable Trust or other estate planning objectives today.  If you have specific estate planning goals, I can help create solutions you may not be aware of. 

 

See lots of estate planning information on my website at: www.myestate-plan.com

 

Thanks for reading my blog.

 

William Daniel Powell

619-980-2297

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

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This document is for informational purposes only.  Nothing in this is to be considered legal advice.  Nothing in this shall create an attorney/client relationship, nor shall it create a confidential relationship.  If you need legal advice (in California), feel free to contact me or someone licensed to practice in your jurisdiction.  I assume no liability or responsibility for actions taken, or not taken, as a result of reading this information

Also, please remember that I speak in generalities in my blog and my website. There are so many different factors that can contribute and completely change the outcome that it would be impractical to discuss all of them here.

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Published in What is an A/B Trust?
Wednesday, 04 May 2016 01:29

Prince Dies Without a Will or Trust

Prince Didn’t Have any Estate Plan!

 

I am always surprised to hear about people that die without any estate plan in place.  I am especially surprised to hear when people with large estates pass away with no plan in place.  This was the most recent case with Prince.  Price died with no Will, and no Trust.  Yesterday a special administrator was appointed.  Now everything that transpires, because the estate will have to be probated, will be public record.  Moreover, a Will is not private, and is easier to contest (generally) than a Trust.  Michael Jackson died with a Will and provided for his children via testamentary trusts, but still this is a public transaction that could have been avoided with a proper estate plan perhaps utilizing a Living Revocable Trust, Irrevocable Trust, or other means.

 

Upon hearing that people die without estate plans in place make me wonder why.  I wonder if they think they are too young to die, or if they think they are too young to plan.  Perhaps they don’t prefer to contemplate their own demise.  No matter the reason, we all know and need to come to grips with the fact that we could die at any age, that having a plan is far better than not planning, and planning for our demise is one of the best gifts we can give to those we love.  A Revocable Living Trust, an Advance Healthcare Directive and other proper estate planning methods can take tremendous stress off of your family.  It can also minimize fighting among family member (not always, I’ll give you that!) and insure that your hard earned assets are given to those you desire to provide for.

 

I believe you are never too young to plan, no estate is too small to prevent providing some peace of mind, and planning is an excellent way to show that you care and that you are remembered.  Please feel free to give me a call and we can establish your Living Revocable Trust or other estate plan objectives.  If you have specific estate planning goals in mind, I can help create solutions you may not be aware of. 

 

See lots of estate planning information on my website at: www.myestate-plan.com

 

Thanks for reading my blog.

 

William Daniel Powell

619-980-2297

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

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This document is for informational purposes only.  Nothing in this is to be considered legal advice.  Nothing in this shall create an attorney/client relationship, nor shall it create a confidential relationship.  If you need legal advice (in California), feel free to contact me or someone licensed to practice in your jurisdiction.  I assume no liability or responsibility for actions taken, or not taken, as a result of reading this information

Also, please remember that I speak in generalities in my blog and my website. There are so many different factors that can contribute and completely change the outcome that it would be impractical to discuss all of them here.

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Sunday, 01 May 2016 23:11

What are Trustee Powers

Trustee Powers

 

 

Who is a Trustee?

 

A Trustee is the person or persons that manage the Trust property for the benefit of the Beneficiary.  The original Trustee is usually the person that establishes the Trust.  Married persons are usually co-trustees and may act together or independently.  The successor trustee usually takes over after some specific event such as the death of one or both Trustees, or the incapacity of the original Trustee. 

 

What are Trustee Powers?

 

What is the difference between a Trustee power, and a Trustee duty?  A duty must be performed by the Trustee, and a power is different in that a Trustee has discretion to exercise the power if he or she chooses.  California Probate Code section 16202 says: The grant of a power to a trustee, whether by the trust instrument, by statute, or by the court, does not in itself require or permit the exercise of the power. The exercise of a power by a trustee is subject to the trustee’s fiduciary duties.

 

A Trustee has the powers, without need for court order, that are granted by the Trust document, conferred by statute (unless limited in the Trust document), and the power to perform any act that a trustee would perform for the purposes of the trust under the standard of care provided in Section 16040 or 16047 of the California Probate Code (unless limited in the Trust document).

 

California Probate Code section 16220 thru 16249 addresses the specific powers of the Trustee and include (but are not limited to) such powers as:

•             the power to collect, hold, and retain trust property received from a settlor or any other person

•             the power to accept additions to the property of the trust from a settlor or any other person.

•             the power to continue or participate in the operation of any business or other enterprise that is part of the trust property and may effect incorporation, dissolution, or other change in the form of the organization of the business or enterprise

•             the power to acquire or dispose of property, for cash or on credit, at public or private sale, or by exchange.

 

For the drafter of a Trust document, confusing a duty with a power can create problems down the road.  If the drafter attempts to modify a Trustee duty by conferring a power to the Trustee is a mistake.  If a clause says that the Trustee has the power to hold property without diversification and does just that by holding a family held business or property, and that property goes down in value, can the beneficiaries surcharge the Trustee for the loss?  A Trustee will be financially liable for losses under certain circumstances, and must therefore take the job of Trustee seriously.  Recall Probate Code 16202 stated above that says: The grant of a power to a trustee, whether by the trust instrument, by statute, or by the court, does not in itself require or permit the exercise of the power. The exercise of a power by a trustee is subject to the trustee’s fiduciary duties.  The court would need to decide if the Trustee is liable under the circumstances.  Care must be taken to avoid situations such as these.

 

I would love to help you and your family.  Call me and we can create your Living Trust or other Estate Planning documents.

See lots of estate planning information on my website at: www.myestate-plan.com

 

Thanks for reading my blog.

William Daniel Powell

619-980-2297

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

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This document is for informational purposes only.  Nothing in this is to be considered legal advice.  Nothing in this shall create an attorney/client relationship, nor shall it create a confidential relationship.  If you need legal advice (in California), feel free to contact me or someone licensed to practice in your jurisdiction.  I assume no liability or responsibility for actions taken, or not taken, as a result of reading this information.

Also, please remember that I speak in generalities in my blog and my website. There are so many different factors that can contribute and completely change the outcome that it would be impractical to discuss all of them here.

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Published in Trustee Powers
Saturday, 30 April 2016 22:44

What is a Charitable Remainder Trust?

What is a Charitable Remainder Trust?

 

 

One way to think of a Charitable Remainder Trust (or CRT) is like a reverse mortgage that you establish with a participating charity.  You promise certain property to a charity, and in return they pay you a certain sum of money per year.  The amount the charity will give you yearly will depend on the value of the property you promise to give the charity, and your age when the charitable remainder trust is established.  Certain organizations offer charitable remainder trusts, and others do not.  Further certain organizations offer the legal service of drafting the CRT for free.  They usually do this to insure the Trust is drafted in the manner they prefer, and to keep the cost of having to review each charitable remainder trust to a minimum.

 

 

Even without a participating charity, a charitable remainder trust can be set up by an individual under the Internal Revenue Service Code.  This would still be an irrevocable trust like in the previous example.  The person that sets up the Trust called the Settlor or Trustor, establishes the irrevocable trust with him or herself as the beneficiary.  They receive a percentage of income, and the remainder goes to a charity.  This is usually considered an advanced estate planning method, but the classification is really pretty unimportant.  The only reason for the distinction is that it is usually used by persons with larger estates looking to reduce estate tax liability.  However, it can be used by anyone.  Some client’s situation is such that they find this option interesting.  Their situation normally is one where they either have huge charitable intent, or have no living relatives and huge charitable intent.  Whatever your situation, we can always discuss various options.

 

See lots of estate planning information on my website at: www.myestate-plan.com 

 

Give me a call today and see how affordable a quality Estate Plan that is 100% attorney advised, and 100% attorney prepared can be.   Effectuate your intentions, obtain your desired results, provide for those whom you care about.

 

 

Thanks for reading my blog.

 

 

William Daniel Powell

 

619-980-2297

 

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

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This document is for informational purposes only.  Nothing in this is to be considered legal advice.  Nothing in this shall create an attorney/client relationship, nor shall it create a confidential relationship.  If you need legal advice (in California), feel free to contact me or someone licensed to practice in your jurisdiction.  I assume no liability or responsibility for actions taken, or not taken, as a result of reading this information.

Also, please remember that I speak in generalities in my blog and my website. There are so many different factors that can contribute and completely change the outcome that it would be impractical to discuss all of them here.

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Does California Have an Easier Probate Process?

 

The simple answer to this question is yes, California has a simple and faster probate process for small estates that qualify. 

 

 

What is Real Property, and What is Personal Property?

 

Real Property is, generally speaking, land and everything that is attached or built into it.  Personal Property is everything else that is not Real Property such as anything that is tangible, movable property that is capable of being touched, felt, seen, or perceived by the senses. 

 

 

Who may use the California Small Estate Affidavit?

 

Heirs of the estate may use the small estate affidavit process.  It is not likely a good idea to use this process if the estate has a large amount of debt or where the estate is insolvent, or where the beneficiaries disagree about how the assets should be distributed.  In order to use this small estate procedure, 40 days must have passed since death, and no formal probate proceeding may have been opened.  Further, the estate assets (real and personal) must be valued at, or less than $150,000, and the value of the assets are determined at the time of the decedents death.  If the decedent owned real property, California Probate Code section 13200 provides for the transfer of real property valued up to $50,000 by the affidavit procedure (and there are some different requirements associated with this). 

What Assets Are Involved in the $150,000 Limit?

  • Bank accounts
  • Stocks, bonds, or mutual funds
  • real property valued at up to $50,000
  • similar type assets owned in the decedents name alone

What Items Are Excluded from the $150,000 Limit?

The items not included in the decedents estate include:

  • Property held in joint tenancy
  • Items held in a Trust, or Living Trust
  • Cars or vehicles
  • Retirement accounts such as an IRA
  • Life insurance or other accounts with a beneficiary designation
  • Pay on Death accounts

 

Because we live in the San Diego area, the requirement that the real property be valued at less than $50,000 is not usually a reality.  If real property is owned, it is almost always advisable to have a proper estate plan in place.  Not just to avoid probate, but to plan for incapacity, and better control how our estate is handled after our passing, and potentially provide some protection for our beneficiary from predators, creditors, bad marriages, or even from themselves.  

 

See lots of estate planning information on my website at: www.myestate-plan.com

 

For this and other significant reasons, a proper Estate Plan is important to have in place.  We do our best to care for ourselves and those we care most about.  Call me and let’s get your Estate Plan together to get you the peace of mind it provides.

 

Thanks for reading my blog.

William Daniel Powell

619-980-2297

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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This document is for informational purposes only.  Nothing in this is to be considered legal advice.  Nothing in this shall create an attorney/client relationship, nor shall it create a confidential relationship.  If you need legal advice (in California), feel free to contact me or someone licensed to practice in your jurisdiction.  I assume no liability or responsibility for actions taken, or not taken, as a result of reading this information

Also, please remember that I speak in generalities in my blog and my website. There are so many different factors that can contribute and completely change the outcome that it would be impractical to discuss all of them here.

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